New KC Breed Watch Guide – what it means for Dachshund exhibitors

The Kennel Club has published a fantastic new resource for judges and exhibitors to explain the requirements of Breed Watch.

The new guide is available to access from the KC website as a pdf, here.

Breed Watch offers opportunities for judges to develop their understanding and raises awareness of health and welfare, ensuring it remains a key priority when judging and exhibiting dogs at shows. The new resource features guidance for judges on individual breeds, the regulations that apply to judges when judging breeds within the Breed Watch categories and further information on how the Kennel Club uses information received from judges to work with breeds to make health and welfare improvements.

If you would like to request a hard copy of the booklet, click here.
dachs_breed_watch_2016

For Dachshund exhibitors and judges, the three Miniature varieties are listed in Breed Watch Category 2 where the point of concern is body weight/condition. This relates, primarily, to dogs that may appear to be thin. The Breed Council’s guidance on Dachshund body weight and condition is here.

For those Dachshund owners interested in showing their dog, the Breed Standard defines the Miniature and Standard varieties on the basis of their weight:
Standards: 9-12 kg (20-26 lbs), Miniatures: Ideal weight 4.5 kg (10 lbs), desired maximum weight 5 kg (11 lbs);  The Breed Standard also says: Exhibits which appear thin and undernourished should be severely penalised.  
Remember, the Breed Standard describes the ideal sizes of Standard and Miniature Dachshunds; these ARE NOT “target weights” for individual dogs.  Every Dachshund will be different and will need to be fed to keep his ideal weight for his frame.
Judges have a responsibility to ensure that there are no welfare issues, particularly of Miniature Dachshunds, related to the weight clause in the Breed Standard.  You can download the Breed Council’s Dach-Facts information sheet here.  A dog is too thin if, when running your fingertips over its body without applying any pressure, you can:
  1. Easily feel the ribcage and
  2. Easily feel the spine and
  3. Easily feel the shoulder-blades and hip-bones
If your Dachshund is one of life’s “thin dogs” no matter how much you feed him or her, you would be well advised not to show him/her, however good you feel he/she is in other respects.
Sometimes, young male dogs can go through a phase of not eating well and appearing underweight; such dogs would be best left at home until they body-up, rather than being shown looking thin.  It is equally unacceptable to show a dog that is overweight and who looks like it needs more exercise and/or less food.
Dachshunds should be shown in fit, well-muscled condition so that it is clear they could do the work for which they were originally bred.
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