Category Archives: Best of Health – Our Dogs

Focus and alignment – a challenge for Breed Plan Communications: my December 2017 “Best of Health” article

Last month, I wrote about the soon to be published Breed Health and Conservation Plans (BHCPs) which the KC is developing with Breed Clubs. Initially, 17 breeds are in the pipeline to have their plans published. These will be really important documents to set a baseline for each breed’s health status and genetic diversity. They …

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Planning for Breed Improvement – my November 2017 “Best of Health” article

Planning for Breed Improvement At the October 2017 Breed Health Coordinator Symposium, Dr. Katy Evans gave an update on the progress being made to create Breed Health and Conservation Plans. Katy is Health Research Manager in the KC’s Health Team and has been leading this project which is working on plans for 17 breeds initially. …

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Trust or trash? Just what can you believe? – My October 2017 “Best of Health” article

The annual KC Breed Health Coordinator (BHC) Symposium was, for the first time, opened up to people who are not BHCs. As a result, around 200 people attended the event which featured a packed agenda of topics. There has already been an overview of the day published in Our Dogs (13/10/17) but, this month, I …

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Making sure the obvious really is obvious; my September 2017 “Best of Health” article

Some people are caught out and surprised at the “unintended consequences” of a decision or action to improve breed health. For others, these are entirely predictable outcomes which are merely minor blips on the journey towards a more significant strategic goal. The world of breed health improvement has plenty of examples and, this month, I …

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Complex diseases: can we really find the genes? “Best of Health” August 2017

Many breeds have been pinning their hopes on finding the genetic mutations responsible for diseases and health issues with the expectation that breeders will be able to test their way out of problems. In some breeds, we have been “fortunate” to be able to identify so-called simple mutations from which DNA tests have been developed. …

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