Tag Archives: Our Dogs “Best of Health”

An international approach to breed health improvement – “Best of Health” – January 2019

This year, the International Partnership for Dogs will be holding its 4th workshop. Our Kennel Club is hosting the event which will take place from 30th May to 1st June, near Windsor. The Kennel Club was a founding partner of the IPFD since its inception in 2014 and hosted the first ever meeting of the …

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How long will my dog live? Longevity Study – my October 2018 “Best of Health” article

How long will my dog live? It seems a long time ago, but in 2014 the KC ran its pedigree dogs breed health survey with an online survey that attracted just under 50,000 responses. Among these were 5663 reports of dogs that had died. Now, that set of mortality data has been analysed and published …

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“The elephant in the room” – my June 2018 Best of Health article

Earlier this month I was invited to make a presentation on Breed Improvement Strategies to the Dog Breeding Reform Group (DBRG). The DBRG is a registered charity that aims to promote humane behaviour towards animals by providing and supporting initiatives to improve dog welfare. It wants to be “a voice for dogs” and was founded …

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My “Best of Health” article for May 2018 – A review of worldwide KC breeding policies

This month saw the publication of a paper in the Veterinary Journal titled “Breeding policies and management of pedigree dogs in 15 national kennel clubs”. The authors include Dr Tom Lewis from our Kennel Club. The authors investigated approaches being adopted by Kennel Clubs internationally and what they see as high priority issues. They issued …

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Managing breeds for a secure future – my March 2018 “Best of Health” article

The return of the snow, recently, reminded me of my Christmas reading. Sponenberg, Martin and Beranger’s “Managing breeds for a secure future” is now in its second edition (2017). It has been updated to reflect the emerging debates in animal breeding and includes domestic species such as dogs. The authors are academics but attempt to …

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